Truth Will Out Radio: Hollywood Lies About Slavery


Truth Will Out Radio is back with the final part of Messerchmitt’s presentation on Leon Degrelle, while Dennis Wise and Sven Longshanks discuss slavery in the movies and how it is used to give White people a guilt complex.

Messerschmitt begins by reminding us of events last week, before telling us what happened between the escape from the Cherkassy pocket and Degrelle's life in Spain after the war. For many months after those hellish three weeks inside the pocket Degrelle and his men would suffer from horrible nightmares. During this time Hitler wanted to talk to him in person and decorate him with the Knight's Cross, so he was flown to the Führer's headquarters in East Prussia for a memorable meeting with the man himself. After a quote on Degrelle's impression from that meeting, we hear about his reception in Belgium where he and his men were cheered on as they paraded through Brussels.

The 21 days of leave the Walloons were granted were all too short and next they were sent to Estonia to stop the advancing Soviets and allow the Estonian refugees to escape. In spite of the situation, with defeat seeming ever more unavoidable, the Walloons were of high spirits and never faltered. After another impression of how Degrelle was able to set an example for his men and more accounts of Walloon bravery, we get to how Degrelle was able to escape to Spain at the very end of the war and the shameful and disgusting manner in which the post-war Belgian government treated Rexist family members, including Degrelle's own family.

After discussing Schmitt’s presentation, Dennis then gives us a movie review of ‘12 Years a Slave’ which claims slaves were mistreated and beaten by Whites, yet also reproduced while they were in such conditions. In the same way the Jews make films encouraging us to hate Germans and feel sorry for Jews, this film is intended to make us hate all Whites and feel sorry for Negroes. Blacks were not mistreated by the White man, they were immeasurably better off being cared for and looked after by us, than they ever were left to their own devices in Africa. In their own habitat they had no clothing, no agricultural ability, no ability to dig for water, no skills at animal husbandry and would be reduced to eating one another when they could not find any suitable land to graze upon. They were good at picking cotton though, so in exchange for their work on the plantation in America, they were treated to luxuries such as never had existed before among the tribes of Africa.

Watching this film stirred Dennis’ memory to previous tv series and films he had seen on similar subjects. These all followed a similar theme and encouraged the sexual mixing of the two races, always showing White women falling for a noble savage, while the White men would all be portrayed as monsters. Lynching is always made out to be a bad thing, when it was an entirely necessary swift execution of justice. If you had a White family living out in the sticks on their own and outnumbered by Negroes 10 to 1, you had to put down any whiff of insurrection straight away. Northerners would come down south and tamper with the Negroes, telling them that they were just the same as the White man and should rise up in revolt and the Jews fill this same role today, encouraging Black Lies Matter to rise up and revolt against us.

Slavery was just a natural system that ensured both the Negro and the White man benefitted from each other’s skills. We cannot go back to it today, but at the same time we should not be ashamed of our behaviour and we should correct those who portray it as evil. Dennis and Sven come up with plenty of instances where that can be done in this podcast.

Presented by Dennis Wise, Sven Longshanks and Messerschmitt

Truth Will Out Radio: Hollywood Lies About Slavery – TWOR 081216

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  1. " Lynching is always made out to be a bad thing, when it was an entirely necessary swift execution of justice."

    And contrary to popular belief, "lynching" did not necessarily mean hanging. Download and read this very informative book: "The Truth About Lynching and the Negro in the South" written in 1918 by Winfield H. Collins, A.M, Ph.D., to find out about the truth and facts of this swift form of justice.

    On page one of the first chapter it clearly states:

    It is generally supposed that the custom or practice of lynching in this country had its origin in the method of punishment used by a Virginian farmer named Lynch, who during the Revolutionary War sought in this way to maintain order in his community or section,-hence, Lynch's. Law, and Lynch law, from which comes the word "lynching."

    In the beginning, however, the term seldom, if ever, conveyed the meaning "to put to death"; nor does it appear that Negroes were lynched even so often as whites. The methods of punishment in the majority of cases consisted of riding the victim on a rail, beating or whipping him, and often of giving him a coat of tar and feathers.


    Keep up the great work, Sven & Co.

  2. I did not know what was meant by "riding the victim on a rail" as mentioned in above post so I looked it up:

    Riding the rail (also called being "run out of town on a rail") was a punishment most prevalent in the United States in the 18th and 19th centuries in which an offender was made to straddle a fence rail held on the shoulders of two or more bearers. The victim was then paraded around town or taken to the city limits and dumped by the roadside.

    Being ridden on a rail was typically a form of extrajudicial punishment administered by a mob, sometimes in connection with tarring and feathering, intended to show community displeasure with the offender so they either conformed their behavior to the mob's demands or left the community.

    See picture here: